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us in person. all the classes at the pacific energy center are free of charge. thanks for showing us an actual system being installed and thank you for being with us. hope to see you soon. >> welcome. we are here doing our building san francisco tour. we're going to have a very interesting tour of elevators in sanford cisco. we have all gotten into an elevator, the doors have closed, and it has carried us to our destination. have you ever wondered how elevators were -- work? we check out the need outside the elevator using current technology and we learn about the latest destination elevated technology all here in san francisco. we will also visit the machinery where all the behind- the-scenes gears control these incredible machines. we are very fortunate today to have an expert with those who is going to walk us are around elevators in san francisco. can you tell us about the history of elevators in san francisco? the measure -- >> sure. the history of elevator technology evolves with the city. first elevators were installed for moving materials in the 1860's. in the 1870's, the fir
will be available electronically, that means sort of in its raw form for the public to use? >> exactly. >> i think it would be great at that time to have some sort of public training. my guess is a lot of people are really interested in neighborhood scale data. so, looking at the map, some of the data is -- you have the boundaries quite large. so, to look -- to help them figure out how to use that to sort of answer the questions people in neighborhoods are looking for. >> okay, yeah. definitely. >> commissioner antonini. >> a couple things i read in a little more depth through most of this. one thing that seemed a little curious to me is a category private household employees, and that number increased a lot from 2002 to 2011. i'm not sure how these are really being categorized. there are many instances where in a private home you'll employ someone often as an outside contractor, like a gardner and he or she will do a number of different jobs in a given day. they will have many different employers, of course. i'm not quite sure how that does -- those figures are compiled. also in similar ways, peo
, and it has carried us to our destination. have you ever wondered how elevators were -- work? we check out the need outside the elevator using current technology and we learn about the latest destination elevated technology all here in san francisco. we will also visit the machinery where all the behind- the-scenes gears control these incredible machines. we are very fortunate today to have an expert with those who is going to walk us are around elevators in san francisco. can you tell us about the history of elevators in san francisco? the measure -- >> sure. the history of elevator technology evolves with the city. first elevators were installed for moving materials in the 1860's. in the 1870's, the first passenger elevator was installed, and that allowed building heights to go up to about seven floors. starting in the 18 eighties, 1890's, the first electric elevators were installed. that allowed for buildings to go up even higher, even more than 10 floors, and those were the first elevators that became representative of what we consider modern elevators today. >> so the height of buildi
] >> this is one example. facebook, google plus, instagram. we have all these wires in having people talk to us. what would they want and establish it, what kind of events that will help us be even more philanthropic about this. san francisco, santa clara, san jose, we want that effort to insight people to take this opportunity to join our nfl, join our 49ers, to join all of our sports crazy efforts and education efforts and all the things that we really reflect success in the san francisco bay area to join us in promoting this event and making sure that when we are ready to submit our bid to the nfl in may of next year that we will have created a community-based bay area wide effort to reflect on this wonderful opportunity. right now it is only an invitation but we will show this allows us to create the most collaborative efforts with segments of business education, bay area, the different mayors coming together, bringing us all together on this incredible opportunity. i have always thought that sports is an inspiration. i'm a big fan of 9ers, i know they will have an opportunity to win tonigh
. that is being rolled out at education, energy, treasury, u.s. aid, other agencies as well. these programs are celebrating the use of open data and hopefully will provide some additional support. i think there are even folks here who have been part of these events. we're excited for that continued support and hope you can all join this initiative in the neutral. -- future. >> so, earlier you were talking a little about kind of how san francisco came in in terms of actually ading the officer. more broadly how do you think san francisco compares and what are some of the other cities that are doing really well in terms of open data? >> i should be clear. when san francisco is third, we have a pact. i'll add to that actually. what's great in san francisco is there is not just going to be a chief data officer. there is also the office of civic innovation. jay's team, shannon's team. by having both of those units in place i think there is going to be a really powerful team. because you can't just open up the data. you have to do things like this, where you get the community together or you have
and esther solar for giving us this beautiful space to meet in today. is esther here? i haven't seen her. we'll thank her later. they made this space available for us. good morning, my name is me linda hague for those of you who don't know me. i was appointed by president obama a little more than two years ago to be united states attorney and it is my incredible honor to represent the president, the obama administration here in the northern district of california. welcome to the stop bullying summit. i'm a federal prosecutor so it may seem odd that here we are talking about bullying and we asked all of you to be here and i want to explain the origin of that and why this happened. you people, everybody in this room, has been involved in this issue and is doing incredible work on this issue and we were so honored to be a part of it and to meet with all of you and to speak with you about it. the origin is that as the united states attorney, the administration wants me, wants all the united states attorneys, to go out into the community. it's actually a very different role for the unite
. [laughter] >> sort of spices up the meeting. >> for us, i think the most important thing we are offering is something quintessentially san francisco. something that they cannot find anywhere else. we have two fetish fares in san francisco. there are only three other cities in the world that do that. new york, toronto, and berlin. i have been to all three and they are not nearly the same size as well we produced, or nearly as diverse. what we are always thinking about is what we are offering people that is so quintessentially san francisco that we get -- it cannot be gotten anywhere else. we are also told the switching of the entertainment this year. we have dance areas where the slides used to be. i think that for us it is about making sure that people, even if they came to san francisco in particular five years ago, that they are not experiencing the fight -- the same thing. it speaks to one of the priorities. the never-ending city. or something. i do not remember, exactly, but it is the same basic concept. even if you come here several times over and over, you will not have the same ex
to go through one formal is much better for all of us. it is much easier to get a handle on what is going on. aou, we are doing really well with that. we will look into that and have it going through direct. >> so, we used all of these out. does anyone else have a question? we have about five more minutes before we take a break. i know the you are tired. please, ask and be polite. robbie? [laughter] >> hello. this is a question for all the panelists. given that we now have an entertainment commission, according to the economic impact study, in the last three years to four years, we have lost the north beach jazz fest. power to the peace canceled for the second year in a row. and we lost the love fest. is outdoor entertainment, those sort of events, is there a crisis there that we are collectively ignoring? what can be done to fix it? thank you. [laughter] [applause] >> i will answer that. sure. i think that each event is as strong as the people behind it, quite frankly. what we can do, obviously, breaking out, we can do some that -- some best practices. some people have been adam
are also told the switching of the entertainment this year. we have dance areas where the slides used to be. i think that for us it is about making sure that people, even if they came to san francisco in particular five years ago, that they are not experiencing the fight -- the same thing. it speaks to one of the priorities. the never-ending city. or something. i do not remember, exactly, but it is the same basic concept. even if you come here several times over and over, you will not have the same experience. as we do that, enhancing certain things. live stages have big-name bands. headlining the folsom street fair, people are now looking forward to our entertainment in ways they did not 10 years ago. >> commander, how do we prepared to assist an outdoor event? what training do the folks on the street have when engaging with patrons of the event? >> i am sorry, i have never heard of little booth. not my genre, i guess. you know, all of our officers receive a lot of training at the academy level and the special operations group on crowd control. you all know the chief was year earlier. an o
for us to highlight the best of this region. we don't have the details, looking at february 2016 if we are fortunate enough to win this bid. but there is a lot of different events that go on. every restaurant will be full. all hotel also be full. event spaces will be full from san jose to santa clara, san francisco and i have started talking to people in napa and sonoma. they are excited to be as well. >>> we said earlier super bowl 50 is very special. the nfl has been playing games in other countries for the sport. san francisco is an inter national city so we will probably have additional events that no one's thought of in terms of not only celebrating the 50ses but emphasizing inter national perspective on the sport of football. that is a key strength. like any franchise, they are looking for more market gain, this is where it will happen. >> we are going to ask rich to come up. if this group could stay and answer questions. but rich has a special way to throw this out. once again thank you to goodby silverstein for everything. >> i like that. my birthday it rained every day. snowed
audrey asked the economic question of me almost immediately after taking office. it benefits us the truth about $55 million in tax revenue. nightlife is the only significant industry in this city that sometimes gets treated at times as it is a nuisance, a problem to be managed. and of course, we have to focus on making sure it is safe and that people are complying with the laws and that we are not having shooting. but when you get so focused on combating the negatives -- every industry has the negatives. you can sometimes lose sight of the positives and we know there are a huge positives for nightlife in the city. we know that a lot of our street shares are at risk -- street fairs are at risk of being given fees to death. we have completely outdated the planning commission like that mission how are used district, which makes it extremely hard to do anything alcohol related in a big swath of the mission. there was a bowling alley that wanted to go in at 17th and van ness and they were not going to be able to do it because they would have been banned from even selling beer. that i
live in the united states. and each person uses an average of 100 gallons of water every day. man: what it takes to actually make clean water is somewhat a mystery to most customers. woman: so how does water get from the river into your house, or here at school? woman: somebody has to bring that water to us, and somebody has to take it away when we're finished with it. man: the water infrastructure is vital for disease protection, fire protection, basic sanitation, economic development, and for our quality of life. man: you just can't visualize all the assets that are under our feet. we have about two million miles of pipe in this nation. if you're walking around in an urban area, you're probably stepping on a pipe. man: our grandparents paid for, and put in for the first time, these large distribution systems. woman: and in many cases, it's not been touched since. man: we're at a critical turning point. much of that infrastructure is wearing out. narrator: our water infrastructure is made up of complex, underground systems that function continuously. these 10 locations take a loo
and neighborhood parks, call 831- 5510. you can also write us at permits and reservations. or walking in and say hello at old log cabin, golden gate park. and of course you can find more information at sfrecpark.org. good morning, everybody. lots of people know each other here, wonderful. it will be a great day. welcome, everybody, welcome to san francisco. to some of you, welcome to the presidio, welcome to this absolutely gorgeous futures without violence center. i want to start by thanking futures without violence and esther solar for giving us this beautiful space to meet in today. is esther here? i haven't seen her. we'll thank her later. they made this space available for us. good morning, my name is me linda hague for those of you who don't know me. i was appointed by president obama a little more than two years ago to be united states attorney and it is my incredible honor to represent the president, the obama administration here in the northern district of california. welcome to the stop bullying summit. i'm a federal prosecutor so it may seem odd that here we are talking abou
welcomed that request that the attorney general made of us and the president made of us and as a result i've gone out into my community and my district goes from the oregon border to monteray, and i've met with all kinds of different people. we have 33 indian tribes in the northern district of california, most people don't know, and i've met with those people. i've met with the muslim community, with the siekh american community, with the lgbq community, with the human rights commission in san francisco, all kinds of people, and we talk about all kinds of things. we talk about things that are more common to the u.s. attorney. we talk about fraud and identify theft and hate crimes and civil rights issue and there's one thing that comes up in absolutely every conversation that i have had with people in the district, and that was bullying. and it really, it was, it's not surprising to the people in this room, i know. it was not surprising to me but it was troubling to me that in every community that i was meeting with, this was an issue prrp violence, harassment, physical, cyber, social
using these principles. [applause] in fact san francisco was recently recognized by the world green building council as having the greenest building policy by any local level in the year 2011 and we just began implementing our existing commercial energy performance ordinance which helps private property owners lower energy use. through san francisco's program green sf we are making it easier for property owners to secure financing for green building upgrades and as can you see green buildings has become the standard rather than the exception. for our public libraries to affordable housing units, even to the home of our world series giants and their structure our buildings are achieving lead certification at a rapid pace and our san francisco public utilities commission has won smartest building in the world and we have honors such as the greenest city in north america, the walkable city, and the best green policies, the green tech of north america and forbes recognized that san francisco has the most green jobs in the united states. that's jobs. that's one of the most important t
a conversation about this issue with us included. i can't tell you how much we appreciate it. so thank you very much for being here. as i said, we're grailsd with the presence of everybody who is anybody on this issue. people who have been involved in this issue for a long time who understand it much better than we do, we are here to learn from you and to be part of the discussion. we've got federal, state and local policy makers, elected officials, educators, law enforcement officials and leaders from the private and public sector, all of whom have traveled here from washington, dc from sacramento and all over the bay area. so thank you for being here today. we are grateful for an opportunity to come together with you to create schools and communities where young people are healthy and safe and feel welcome and they are allowed to learn and they are allowed to thrive. this day is devoted to help all of us deepen our understanding of this issue of the problem through data, through research, through anecdotes, to put real solutions in place, to comply with new state and draw laws on bullying a
youngstrom, who protect us and keep us safe every day. we acknowledge you and know you are heroes and we are very, very sorry for the loss of officer youngstrom. our third panel is called prevention and community engagement, promising approaches to stop bullying in the bay area. our moderator is rebecca randell, vice president of education programs at common sense media based here in san francisco. we became ka is responsible for partnering with school districts and departments of education across the country to help children and youth learn how to think critically, behave safely and participate responsibly in our digital world which we all have heard brings its own complications. she oversees the department's education staff, working in the 3 largest districts in the country, new york, denver, maine, texas, florida, and the bay area. ladies and gentlemen, please welcome rebecca randell. >> great, thank you, melinda. i'm going to ask you all to come up now. as they get seated i'll say a few words. all these panelists really bring a great wealth of experience and wisdom to what on the
was considered state-of-the-art throughout the world, and is still in use in many cities today. but cities constructed these systems before treatment was the standard. and even today's largest treatment plant doesn't have the capacity to treat the sudden volumes of water rushing through a combined system during rain. the plant is overloaded, and the excess rainwater, mixed with untreated raw sewage, is diverted straight into local waterways, creating a combined sewer overflow, or cso. there are over 700 communities in the united states with combined sewer systems. the other approach was to separate wastewater from stormwater, using two pipe networks. this separate system simply carries the stormwater away from the city. but even separate systems pollute the watershed. in developed areas, concrete and other impervious services prevent water from naturally soaking into the land. as the rainwater moves over the roads and concrete expanse, it captures trash and invisible chemicals, sending them straight to the nearest waterway -- untreated. when engineers first designed america's water infrast
and they are allowed to thrive. this day is devoted to help all of us deepen our understanding of this issue of the problem through data, through research, through anecdotes, to put real solutions in place, to comply with new state and draw laws on bullying and to measure our progress. it's a promise we want to join you in keeping to our children and our youth in california. some of you know that we started this summit yesterday with a screening of the documentary film, bully, to 3,000 students in san francisco from san francisco's public schools. the superintendent of schools you're going to hear from in a minute, he was there, i know ter theresa sparks was there, i was so proud of san francisco in being there because the superintendent, he's, you can tell he's a teacher because he took control of that room. there was a thousand people in that room, he had them all raise their hands to quiet them down, it was beautiful. you could see the teacher in him. but i was so proud of being in san francisco because the kids -- kids are kids -- they were warned, you need to be respectful, you nee
morning. the challenge of 3 minutes to speak about programs that are best practices, i probably used up half my time just saying that. let me be clear as the next slide would come up, the problem of bullying is changing, morphing, mutating, younger, meaner, more pervasive as kids have more tools. i want to be clear that the approach that our nation has taken to date is out of the ashes of columbine. we refer to it as an outside approach. what most schools did back then was try to secure a school from ingress, guns coming in and sro's and cameras can stop the guns but they can't stop the kids who bring in other weapons, weapons of bias, weapons of grudges from the neighborhood, values from home. we need to have a different approach. the approach we are talking about is a relational approach. it's an inside out approach, an approach really based on empowering young people not to be consumers but to be contributors in their own schools, not to be the problems but to be the solutions because clearly we've learned and know that we cannot legislate compassion and we cannot punish our chi
royal armies; other irish influx arrived from the u.s. for the construction of railroads used to transport sugar cane to the sugar plantations. that was at the end of the 19th century. and then at the beginning of the 20th century, we're talking 1902, 1910, before odono that i mentioned before, this man who gave his name to -- he was very proud of this lighthouse. the cubans offer hospitality to general alexander alejandro o'reilly. he rose through the ranks of the spanish army. the spanish sent alexander o'reilly to cuba to form a militia. he was appointed governor of louisiana and head of the army later on. he arrived in august, 1769, and took formal possession of louisiana for spain. think of new orleans and cuba, in particular havana, governors there were also in cuba so there was all this traveling from one city to another because later when i got my ph.d. from tulaine university and i went to the irish channel. it's interesting, the irish history connected with new orleans. so the o'reilly family has been in louisiana for centuries. in cuba, nobody remembers him but it w
of the criminal rampage that began in irvine, california. he used a firearm to rob to banks in southern california, of threatening to shoot the tellers if they did not comply. gave no consideration to anyone who got in the way of his criminal ambition or effort to escape. as a direct result of his disregard for anyone who might come in to counter with his criminal endeavors, and as well as san francisco police officer lives were jeopardized. the suspect complete disregard for the public put a great risk any person who might inadvertently cross his path, should he escape from the park. searchers got ryan, rubin reyes recognize the danger. even when faced with serious bodily injury or death, these officers remain steadfast and determined to protect not only themselves and one another, but the public at large from the disregard of the fleeing fugitive. sir john ryan, officer lou andrelieu and reyes , when confd with a violent situation, they responded with no were the bravery and poise. they were fully responsible to the danger, but to the rapidly- devolving life-threatening circumstances that unfold
on the sunshine task force and we had a lot of members of public come in front of us, looking for reasons why all of these projects were overbudget and i think there is a lot of waste there government. we just talked about the hetch hetchy matter and building was supposed to be $140 million, but it was actually $65 million over budget. the department of public works doesn't even have all of its receipts. the bond oversight committee is supposed to be have access to those receipts. they can't get them. so we ce[6ud money is not accounted for. we found waste in the arts commission, which the controllers office confirmed and the civil grand jury confirm and we also found waste in various other departments. and this board of supervisors needs people on it who will actually ask those questions. thank you. we have a couple other candidates who wanted to jump in here. mr. davis and miss selby. >> after $1.5 billion in public service sector cuts in san francisco since 2008, since our budget crisis, we can't balance our budget going forward on cuts alone. we have got to look for revenue with muni faili
, they rust. they get to where you turn them on and nothing happens. but it is so totally used in every nook and cranny, that making any accommodation to shut it down, to do something to it, is very difficult. narrator: two massive underground tunnels, called simply tunnel 1 and tunnel 2, provide most of the city's water supply. they run hundreds of feet below manhattan, far deeper than the subways. built at the beginning of the 20th century, they are concrete-lined and bored through solid rock. they could last centuries. but the mechanical equipment within them will not. engineers in the 1950s discovered rust on the tunnel's valves. there were concerns that if they closed the valves for tunnel inspections, they may never open again, leaving new york city without water. so they chose to keep them open. as a result, there has not been significant inspection, maintenance, or repair of the tunnels in decades. no one knows their current condition. hurwitz: currently, city tunnel 1 and city tunnel number 2 would be feeding each half of the city. so you'd lose half the city if you didn't have a re
to remove it at the drinking water treatment plant. lloyd: what epa said to us was, "you can have an exemption from filtration "if you keep this undeveloped, "and if you can manage the wastewater so that it does not pollute your water supply." and we feel that we've reached the point where we can really keep it clean enough to drink unfiltered for the indefinite future. and new york city is in a small club of cities that actually have that filtration avoidance waiver. narrator: while municipalities are responsible for maintaining systems and source supply, the standards that protect water are established at the federal level. there are two important pieces of federal legislation that were both enacted in the early to mid-1970s. the first was the clean water act, which acts to protect rivers and lakes, and sources of drinking water. the second was the safe drinking water act, that provides federal standards to assure the safety of the water that we drink. both acts have been amended since they were first adopted, and they're both cornerstones for the water issues that we face in am
-- good legislation. there's no conditional use requirement to have this. a lot of people today want to have food, drink, and be able to have some music. how can we get the limited live entertainment excluded from the know amplified or no live entertainment excluded on the transfers? >> that is going to mostly driven locally. most of the conditions you'll ever see on an abc license are because we rely, to a great extent, on the police department and local officials to determine what is best for their communities. i'm not trying to pin this on you guys or blame you guys, but we do try to work with you. we do not tend to want to overrule the police department very often. now that said, i get a fair number of petitions and appeals to me. typically, they are from the neighbors. i want to see that there is actually a practical problem posed -- that the condition is there to solve, not that this is the way the things have been or maybe there's someone who is satisfied by what is potentially wrought by having live entertainment. it is always a case by case. generally, very deferential -- i
Search Results 0 to 46 of about 47 (some duplicates have been removed)

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